Special Events Information for Religious Organizations, Service Clubs or Fraternal Organizations

Under the Health Protection and Promotion Act (HPPA), all special event organizers, including religious organizations, service clubs and fraternal organizations, are required to notify public health units if they plan to serve food to the public.

Religious organizations, service clubs or fraternal organizations that prepare or serve meals for special events may be exempt from some requirements in the Ontario Food Premises Regulation if they meet specific conditions:

The premises must still comply with the Health Protection and Promotion Act and the Smoke-Free Ontario Act(see tobacco requirements below). In addition, the EOHU recommends that all persons involved in food handling complete the Food Handler Certification training.

Religious Organizations, Service Clubs and Fraternal Organizations: Definitions and Examples

1. RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATION:

Defined as an organization, other than a registered charity, of which a congregation is a constituent part, that adheres to beliefs, evidenced by the religious and philosophical tenets of the organization, that include a belief in the existence of a supreme being. (Source: Income Tax Act)

2. SERVICE CLUB:

Defined as an organization dedicated to the growth and general welfare of its members and the community. (Source: Webster's Dictionary)

Examples of service clubs include but are not limited to:

  • Optimist Club
  • Rotary Club
  • Royal Canadian Legion
  • Boy Scouts/Girl Guides
  • Community Sports Association
  • Lions Club

3. FRATERNAL ORGANIZATION:

Interpreted as being any organized body of men or women or both who are banded together, not for financial profit, but for mutual help, and to promote moral, intellectual or social benefits among members. (Source: Union Club of BC v. Saanich (1993) 85 BCLR (2d) 167 at 171)

Examples of fraternal organizations include but are not limited to:

  • Knights of Columbus
  • Masonic Lodge
  • Moose Lodge
  • Sisterhoods and Brotherhoods

Tobacco

It is prohibited to smoke or hold lighted tobacco in any enclosed public space or enclosed workplace. It is also prohibited to smoke or hold lighted tobacco in the following outdoor areas: school property, hospital property, within 20 metres of children’s playgrounds and play areas, within 20 metres of certain sporting areas, in all areas where food or drink is served or sold or offered for consumption in the area, or the area that is part of or operated in conjunction with an area where food or drink is served or sold or offered (e.g. a picnic table, chairs, a patio… in conjunction with the area).

Event organizers shall:

  • Ensure “No Smoking” signs are posted at all entrances, exits, washrooms of enclosed public spaces or enclosed workplaces.
  • Ensure that “No Smoking” signs are posted in all areas where food or drink is served or sold or offered for consumption in the area, or the area that is part of or operated in conjunction with an area where food or drink is served or sold or offered (e.g. a picnic table, chairs, a patio… in conjunction with the area).
  • Ensure compliance with the Smoke-Free Ontario Act by monitoring the areas where smoking or holding lighted tobacco are prohibited.

"No Smoking" signs are available at the EOHU.

For more information, please call the EOHU at 613-933-1375 or at 1 800 267-7120.

Examples of Potentially Hazardous Foods

A potentially hazardous food is any food that is capable of supporting the growth of pathogenic organisms or the production of toxins by these organisms. The following list contains examples of potentially hazardous foods:

  • fresh or processed meat, sausages
  • fish and shellfish
  • herb and flavoured oils
  • dairy products (e.g. milk, cream cheese, yogurt)
  • foods containing eggs as ingredients (e.g. custards, salads)
  • eggs
  • antipasto
  • cakes/pastries with whipped cream, cheese, or cream fillings
  • processed beans, including baked, refried and bean salad
  • cabbage rolls
  • canned cured meats
  • low acid canned vegetables (e.g. pH 4.6 beans, asparagus, beets, carrots, mushrooms, broccoli, peas)
  • canned products containing meat, vegetables, soups, sauces, cheese
  • chop suey
  • creamed corn
  • pesto
  • garlic spreads, oils
  • guacamole
  • juice (fruit and vegetable)
  • tofu
  • perogies
  • salsa
  • hummus

(Source: Adapted from the British Columbia – Guide for Temporary Food Markets)